Ann Coffey

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New law to help families of missing to be enacted after delays

A long-awaited law to help relatives of missing people is to be finally enacted in July next year after a long delay.

Ann Coffey, the chair of the All Party Parliamentary Group for Runaway and Missing Children, who has been campaigning for eight years for a law that would allow families to look after their missing loved ones financial and legal affairs, said that the start date could not come a moment too soon.

She said the law was desperately needed as an estimated 2,500 families are currently struggling to sort out their relatives’ bills, mortgage payments and other red tape.

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Deaths of missing people could be prevented

Thursday July 19 2018

Hundreds of lives are being put at risk each year because adults with mental health problems are ‘found and forgotten’ after going missing, according to a Parliamentary Inquiry.  

Ann Coffey – head of the ‘Inquiry into safeguarding missing adults who have mental health issues’ by the All Party Parliamentary Group for Runaway and Missing Children and Adults – said that going missing should be a ‘red flag moment’ which ought to trigger help.

But instead tens of thousands of adults nationally are left alone and isolated with no support on their return home.

There are about 126,000 incidents of adults going missing annually. Up to 600 missing people a year are found dead: the most commonly known cause being suicide.

The inquiry heard that about 80 per cent of adults who go missing are experiencing mental health problems and up to one third go missing again.

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Greater Manchester ‘sent away’ children in danger

Tuesday May 8, 2018

The government has broken a promise to cut soaring numbers of children being “farmed out” to children’s homes vast distances from where they were brought up and live.

Ann Coffey, the chair of the All Party Parliamentary Group for Runaway and Missing Children and Adults, will use a Commons debate today (Tuesday) to say there is growing evidence that “a sent away generation” of vulnerable youngsters are in danger of falling prey to paedophiles and drugs gangs.

The government pledged to clampdown on so called out of borough placements five years ago but there has been a 64 per cent rise nationally in the number of children being sent to live away between 2012 and 2017.

There has also been a huge increase in the number of sent-away children going missing with the number of missing incidents more than doubling to almost 10,000 a year.

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